Available 24/7 (877) 245-6707

Summer Is Here: Protect Yourself And Your Kids From Drowning

Posted on June 28, 2013

Personal injury attorney Eddie Farah recently learned that 100 swimmers in Cape Coral participated in a swimming lesson in order to try to break a world record for the largest swim lesson. The record-breaking attempt was international in scope, with nations all across the world participating in the attempt.

Last year, some 24,000 people from 15 countries on five continents participated.

While setting a world record can be fun for those involved, it is the underlying message of the worldwide swim lesson that is important.

With summer upon us in Florida, thousands of children will be hitting swimming pools, lakes and the ocean to stay cool and have some fun. While it is a property owner’s obligation to assure that their swimming pools are enclosed and have other safety features to prevent children from getting into swimming pools and accidentally drowning, one of the most effective solutions to prevent drowning deaths is perhaps the simplest: teach your children to swim.

From 2010 to 2012, Duval County reported 40 accidental drowning deaths. According to the Florida Department of Health, Florida leads the nation in accidental drownings for children from one to four years of age. Most of those drownings happen in swimming pools.

The manager of the public pool in Cape Coral where the mass swim lesson was held told Count On 2 News that teaching kids how to swim can reduce accidental drowning of children between one and four by an amazing 88 percent.

“This is our opportunity to show swim awareness to teach a skill,” the manager said. “Maybe a child can survive when they aren’t in the park and in their private pool, so I look at it as drowning prevention.”

The lead lifeguard at the pool told Count On News that even if a person knows how to swim, it never hurts to learn a few new lessons.

“You will never regret being a better swimmer or being safe around the water, “ he stated

Drowning deaths are preventable. Eddie Farah urges parents in Florida to teach their children to swim to prevent drowning deaths and life-altering injuries. It’s a simple step that pays huge dividends.