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Injuries from Surgical Mesh: What is Informed Consent?

Posted on September 20, 2011

So many women and men we talk to concerning their injuries from surgical plastic prolene mesh don’t even know what type of mesh they have had implanted. In some instances they aren’t sure they even have mesh to support a weak pelvic floor or to repair a hernia. They may have vaguely remembered a conversation with the doctor who told them it would “fix them up” or it’s the “gold standard” in mesh and they shouldn’t worry. Most people want to trust their doctor and they should. Together you form a team with the mutual goal of improving your health.

Here are the types of mesh that may have been used on you.

Johnson & Johnson/ Ethicon Women’s Health & Urology
Ethicon TVT
Gynecare TVT
Gynemesh PS
Prolene Polypropylene Mesh Patch
Secur

Bard
Avaulta Plus BioSynthetic Support System
Avaulta Solo Synthetic Support System
Faslata Allograft
Pelvicol Tissue
PelviSoft Biomesh
Pelvitex Polypropylene Mesh
Pelvilace
Ventrio Hernia Patch
PERFIX light Plug for hernia repair

American Medical Systems or AMS
SPARC is a mesh used to treat stress urinary incontinence

Boston Scientific
Advantage Sling System
Obtryx Curved Single
Obtryx Mesh Sling
Prefyx Mid U Mesh Sling System
Prefyx PPS System

Informed Consent
In many cases these patients did not give their informed consent to have the mesh implanted. What is informed consent? According to the American Medical Association, informed consent is more than just signing a piece of paper. It is the entire communication process between a patient and his or her doctor. The information is complete and includes an understanding of the procedure, the risks and benefits, the alternatives, and the risks of not undergoing the procedure. There should be a period of time where the patient does his own research and thinks about what he’s been told.

Informed Consent is both an ethical and legal obligation in all 50 states and often Farah & Farah’s personal injury attorneys find there is not adequate written evidence that the patient was provided with enough information to make an informed decision before undergoing a procedure.

Farah & Farah’s Bard Avaulta surgical mesh injury attorneys urge you to take home any information about a proposed procedure and do your own homework. Look at contrasting points-of-view, not just the advertisement from the manufacturer. Trust your doctor, but verify.