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AMA Opposes Motorcycle-Only Checkpoints in Georgia

Posted on March 2, 2011

Georgia motorcycle riders are being asked to respond to a proposal to set up motorcycle-only checkpoints. The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reported in an article in its publication that it wants the checkpoints stopped in advance of Daytona Bike Week that runs March 4 through the 13. The organization is asking bikers to contact Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal until some questions are answered.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) gave the state about $70,000 to conduct the motorcycle-only checkpoints. New York State previously had the same safety checkpoints for motorcyclists. The AMA believes that motorcycle safety is important but that focusing attention on crash prevention is the best way to keep everyone on the road safe. The AMA says it wants some questions answered first such as – where is the probable cause? That is usually required before someone is pulled over and questioned by police. And why do states focus their attention on motorcycles only?

Tens of thousands of bikers are expected to converge on Daytona during Bike Week and apparently Georgia wants to get a handle on the situation with the use of public money.

Florida Motorcycle Accident Statistics
There were 376 motorcyclists killed in Florida in 2009, according to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, a decline of 24 percent from 2008. The safety campaign was initiated in 2008 after the state realized that motorcycles made up about 6 percent of Florida traffic but 18 percent of deaths on Florida roads.

The campaign continues to be coordinated by motorcycle clubs, dealers, law enforcement, and community safety groups.

If you or a loved one is suffering after a motorcycle accident, let the experienced Florida motorcycle accident attorneys at Farah & Farah help take you through the process of identifying the responsible party and then help you seek the compensation you deserve from that party.